IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 331: Object, Memory, History

Monday 1 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Research, University of Winchester
Organiser:Katherine Weikert, Department of Archaeology / Department of History, University of Winchester
Moderator/Chair:Björn Weiler, Department of History & Welsh History, Aberystwyth University
Paper 331-aLiturgical Commentaries and Architectural Memory in Medieval Education
(Language: English)
Karl Kinsella, Department of History of Art, University of York
Karl Kinsella, Department of History of Art, University of York
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - General, Education, Mentalities
Paper 331-bEvoking Henry I: Conflict, Memory, and Romanesque Sculpture in Northern England
(Language: English)
Jonathan Turnock, Department of History, Durham University
Jonathan Turnock, Department of History, Durham University
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - Sculpture, Military History, Political Thought
Paper 331-c'How stout the pillar of the church that fell!': Materiality and Remembrance in the Mortuary Roll of Holy Trinity, Caen
(Language: English)
Laura Gathagan, Department of History, State University of New York, Cortland
Laura Gathagan, Department of History, State University of New York, Cortland
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Ecclesiastical History, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Material culture has long been recognised as operating alongside written and oral culture in creating history: objects and images impact individual or collective memories, and can serve as pegs for memory. In the western European Central Middle Ages, in a time of transition and fluidity from differing historical and memory traditions, material culture played a crucial role in shaping the memory, and ultimately the writing, of the past. This session examines instances from the 11th and 12th centuries where materiality influenced memory and history, seeking to illuminate the roles of materiality in our constructions of history.