IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 345: Writing Stones: Describing Urban Materialities in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, II

Monday 1 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Jakob Ecker, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Mateusz Fafinski, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Moderator/Chair:Gerda Heydemann, Geschichte der Spätantike und des frühen Mittelalters, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Paper 345-aThe Church and the Roman City in Syriac Chronicles
(Language: English)
Jakob Ecker, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Jakob Ecker, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Jakob Ecker, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought
Paper 345-bEnemies at the Gate: Two Alemannian Reges and the Representation of Episcopal Power in Augustobona and Batavis
(Language: English)
Philipp Margreiter, Institut für Alte Geschichte und Altorientalistik, Universität Innsbruck
Philipp Margreiter, Institut für Alte Geschichte und Altorientalistik, Universität Innsbruck
Philipp Margreiter, Institut für Alte Geschichte und Altorientalistik, Universität Innsbruck
Index terms: Hagiography, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 345-cPower over Civitas: Control of Urban Space in Early Medieval Charters of the Former Roman Rhine Frontier
(Language: English)
Mateusz Fafinski, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Mateusz Fafinski, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Mateusz Fafinski, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Computing in Medieval Studies, Economics - Urban, Geography and Settlement Studies
Abstract

‘Roman city’ was a phenomenon that spanned a large geographical area. From Late Antiquity onwards this material space became an arena of secular and ecclesiastical interests; with its original functions being transformed the urban zone developed new characteristics. New strategies of narrative and administrative description emerged. By comparing the way the relationship between the Church and authority was described in Syriac Chronicles, how bishops created their image by using Roman materiality to the role former Roman cities played in the power dynamics between ecclesiastical and secular powers, we rediscover the force of urban materiality in shaping post-Roman narratives.