IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 352: Realities and Representations of Power in Urban Castile at the End of the Middle Ages, II: Nobility in the Town

Monday 1 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Cuenca / Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Organisers:José Antonio Jara Fuente, Departamento de Historia, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Cuenca
Alicia Inés Montero Málaga, Departamento de Historia Antigua y Historia Medieval, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Moderator/Chair:José Antonio Jara Fuente, Departamento de Historia, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Cuenca
Paper 352-aPower, Memory, Nobility, and Urban Elites: Funerary Practices in Burgos at the End of the Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Alicia Inés Montero Málaga, Departamento de Historia Antigua y Historia Medieval, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Alicia Inés Montero Málaga, Departamento de Historia Antigua y Historia Medieval, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Index terms: Local History, Political Thought
Paper 352-bDistant Lords and Small Towns: Symbolic Expressions of Seigneurial Power in Castile, Late 14th Century - Mid-15th Century
(Language: English)
Víctor Muñoz-Gómez, Instituto Universitario de Estudios Medievales y Renacentistas, Universidad de La Laguna
Víctor Muñoz-Gómez, Instituto Universitario de Estudios Medievales y Renacentistas, Universidad de La Laguna
Index terms: Local History, Political Thought
Paper 352-cMemories of Urban Space: Female Power Examined through the Wills of Noble Women - Castile in the 15th Century
(Language: English)
Andrea Pagès Poyatos, Departamento de Historia Antigua, Medieval, Paleografía y Diplomática, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Andrea Pagès Poyatos, Departamento de Historia Antigua, Medieval, Paleografía y Diplomática, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Index terms: Gender Studies, Local History
Abstract

After long years of civil war, from 1480 onwards a successful programme of political centralization was already underway in Castile. Its main lines had been essayed, opposed, transacted and finally imposed by a triumphant monarchy profiting from the cooperation offered by towns and a large section of the nobility to help end the war. This cooperation was not given unconditionally but it nevertheless led to the establishment of more fluid channels of communication and the emergence/consolidation of centralized governmental institutions all political players accepted.
In Session I (Royal Agents and the Town) we will examine the difficult imposition of royal centralization in towns, giving special consideration to the relations established by royal and urban agents. Session II (Nobility in the Town) tackles the emergence of a new political logic framing the relationships between urban and noble agents; a logic that, though not eliminating conflict, emphasized other more cooperative political traits.