IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 504: Prosopography, Social Network, and Materialities

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Marco Institute for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Organiser:Lauren L. Whitnah, Marco Institute for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Moderator/Chair:Kate Craig, Department of History, Auburn University, Alabama
Paper 504-aVisualizing the Social Networks of Early Medieval Pilgrims
(Language: English)
Courtney Luckhardt, Department of History, University of Southern Mississippi
Courtney Luckhardt, Department of History, University of Southern Mississippi
Courtney Luckhardt, Department of History, University of Southern Mississippi
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Hagiography, Social History
Paper 504-bThe Politics and Poetics of Pre-Crusade Charters in Medieval Flanders
(Language: English)
Brad Phillis, Department of History, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Brad Phillis, Department of History, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Brad Phillis, Department of History, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Crusades
Paper 504-cBeyond the Blood: The Prosopography of the Leicestershire Pantulf Family
(Language: English)
Dawn Klos, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Dawn Klos, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Dawn Klos, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Law, Local History, Women's Studies
Paper 504-dNetworks of Devotion: Women at the Shrine of St Cuthbert
(Language: English)
Lauren L. Whitnah, Marco Institute for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Lauren L. Whitnah, Marco Institute for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Lauren L. Whitnah, Marco Institute for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Abstract

The medievalist traditions of prosopographical research and modern social network studies have much in common. However, the material implications of these approaches have not yet been fully explored. By examining both physical objects and texts, the papers of this session seek to understand medieval networks of political power, religious affiliation, and the exchange of goods and ideas. By insisting on the importance of materiality for understanding agency, movement, and the lived experience of medieval people, the contributors will advance new ideas about power, space, networks, and objects.