IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 512: Using and Not Using the Past in the Transformation of the Carolingian World, I: Negotiating Carolingian Identities, c. 800-900

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:HERA Project 'After Empire: Using & Not Using the Past in the Crisis of the Carolingian World' / Transformation of the Carolingian World Network
Organiser:Alice Hicklin, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Moderator/Chair:Charles West, Department of History, University of Sheffield
Paper 512-aHincmar of Reims, Carloman II, and the De ordine palatii
(Language: English)
Eric J. Goldberg, Department of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Eric J. Goldberg, Department of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Index terms: Administration, Law, Political Thought
Paper 512-bGlosses Reconsidered: On the Purposes of Biblical Commentaries from Late Carolingian Wissembourg
(Language: English)
Cinzia Grifoni, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Cinzia Grifoni, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Education, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 512-cHumour in the Work of Ermoldus Nigellus: A 9th-Century Carolingian Poet
(Language: English)
Carey Fleiner, Department of History, University of Winchester
Carey Fleiner, Department of History, University of Winchester
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Literacy and Orality, Mentalities
Paper 512-dStraining after Effect: Regino of Prüm, the Death of Charles the Fat, and the Hungarians
(Language: English)
Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This first of four sessions explores concepts of Carolingian identity in the heyday and ‘decline’ of the Carolingian empire. Considering individual authors and texts, the four papers each take a different perspective on their subjects to pose questions considering authority in narrative and the role of using the past, the varied impulses that provoked the composition of texts, and what it meant to be Carolingian.