IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 537: Materiality of Power in England, 1154-1453

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Daniel Oliver, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Moderator/Chair:Daniel Oliver, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Paper 537-aFashioning Legacies: Memorialising the Crusading Past in Early 15th-Century England
(Language: English)
James Gallacher, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
James Gallacher, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
James Gallacher, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Crusades, Lay Piety, Military History
Paper 537-bComing to the King: Obtaining Materials of Authority during the Reign of Henry II
(Language: English)
Matthew Leeper, Department of History, University of Glasgow
Matthew Leeper, Department of History, University of Glasgow
Matthew Leeper, Department of History, University of Glasgow
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Geography and Settlement Studies, Monasticism, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 537-cEnrolment and Effect: Charters of Exemption in the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Ross Kennedy, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Ross Kennedy, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Ross Kennedy, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Crusades, Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This panel will examine the articulation of power through the production, transmission and preservation of official documents such as Charters, Letters, Papal Bulls, and Chronicles. Papers will explore how these documents expressed power within the secular and ecclesiastical institutions of Medieval England between 1154 and 1453. Topics will centre on the workings of charters of exemption, the movement of beneficiaries and production of the royal charter corpus of Henry II, and the mechanisms through which images and ideas pertaining to the crusades were preserved and transmitted in late medieval England.