IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 603: Galbert van Brugge: New Interpretations

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Onderzoekschool Mediëvistiek
Organiser:Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair:Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Respondent:Jeff Rider, Department of Romance Languages & Literatures, Wesleyan University, Connecticut
Paper 603-aThe Treacherous Oath of the Erembalds: A New Look into the Ties of the Group of Count Charles the Good's Murderers
(Language: English)
Bart Peters, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Bart Peters, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Bart Peters, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Law, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Paper 603-bMortal Ambiguity: Framing the Dying by Galbert of Bruges
(Language: English)
David Oldenhof, Radboud Honours Academy, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
David Oldenhof, Radboud Honours Academy, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
David Oldenhof, Radboud Honours Academy, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Mentalities, Rhetoric, Social History
Paper 603-cAn Ambivalent Narrative to Fit God's Plan: Galbert of Bruges's Quest for the Righteous Count of Flanders
(Language: English)
Wendy Govaers, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Wendy Govaers, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Wendy Govaers, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Shortly after the murder of the Flemish count Charles the Good in 1127, Galbert of Bruges, wrote a fresh and detailed account trying to explain the murder and describing the ensuing political troubles in Flanders. This text has always received a lot of historical attention. Thanks to the groundbreaking work of Jeff Rider, who not only published a new edition of the text, but also a translation and a thorough study of its author, we no longer see Galbert as a naive writer simply describing what he saw, but as an artful and conscious author. Following the lead of Rider’s work this session offers some new interpretation of this fascinating piece of historiography.