IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 610: Women and the Natural World in Medieval Literature, II: Spaces

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Olivia Colquitt, Department of English, University of Liverpool
Moderator/Chair:Madelaine Smart, Department of English, University of Liverpool
Paper 610-aThe Virgin Martyr and the Volcano
(Language: English)
Eileen M. Harney, English Department, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Eileen M. Harney, English Department, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Eileen M. Harney, English Department, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin, Lay Piety, Women's Studies
Paper 610-bThe Memory of a Mountain: Engendering the Landscape in the Lai of 'The Two Lovers'
(Language: English)
William Biel, Medieval Studies Program, University of Connecticut
William Biel, Medieval Studies Program, University of Connecticut
William Biel, Medieval Studies Program, University of Connecticut
Index terms: Gender Studies, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Women's Studies
Paper 610-cEcological and Spatial Practices of Domestic Healers in the Paston Letters
(Language: English)
Mikee Delony, Department of Language & Literature, Abilene Christian University, Texas
Mikee Delony, Department of Language & Literature, Abilene Christian University, Texas
Mikee Delony, Department of Language & Literature, Abilene Christian University, Texas
Sarah Sells, Department of Language & Literature, Abilene Christian University, Texas
Sarah Sells, Department of Language & Literature, Abilene Christian University, Texas
Sarah Sells, Department of Language & Literature, Abilene Christian University, Texas
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Gender Studies, Language and Literature - Middle English, Medicine
Abstract

This session examines aspects of spatiality in medieval literature, exploring women’s interactions with the natural world across genres and contexts. In halting the eruption of Mount Etna, Saint Agatha not only prevents the physical destruction of Catania, but also reshapes the cultural and spiritual landscape as Christianity triumphs over paganism. The mountain tomb of Marie de France’s two lovers transforms the landmark into an enduring record of hardship, success, and loss. Meanwhile, ‘The Paston Letters’ provide insight into women’s exploitation of natural spaces within a domestic setting, with their knowledge of healing plants allowing them to transcend female spatial restrictions.