IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 612: Using and Not Using the Past in the Transformation of the Carolingian World, II: Negotiating Culture between Centre and Periphery

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:HERA Project 'After Empire: Using & Not Using the Past in the Crisis of the Carolingian World' / Transformation of the Carolingian World Network
Organiser:Alice Hicklin, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Moderator/Chair:Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 612-aCarolingian Culture and Politics in the Kingdom of Italy through Nonantola's Acta Sanctorum
(Language: English)
Edoardo Manarini, Deutsches Historisches Institut, Roma
Edoardo Manarini, Deutsches Historisches Institut, Roma
Edoardo Manarini, Deutsches Historisches Institut, Roma
Index terms: Hagiography, Political Thought, Religious Life
Paper 612-bA Peripheral Lagoon: Venice in the Post-Carolingian World, Late 9th-10th Centuries
(Language: English)
Francesco Veronese, Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medioevo, Roma
Francesco Veronese, Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medioevo, Roma
Francesco Veronese, Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medioevo, Roma
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought
Paper 612-cCarolingian Culture between Centres and Peripheries: The Case of Early Medieval Catalonia
(Language: English)
Matthias Martin Tischler, Institut d'Estudis Medievals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Matthias Martin Tischler, Institut d'Estudis Medievals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Matthias Martin Tischler, Institut d'Estudis Medievals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Abstract

The areas often described as the Carolingian peripheries, whether the term is interpreted politically or culturally, are vitally important to understanding how post-Carolingian centres of power changed and transformed in the later ninth and tenth centuries. The three papers here all consider the transmission of culture and memory through varied methodologies and perspectives, but are unified by their focus on the porous boundaries of knowledge, culture and identity that define this period.