IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 641: Things, Words, and Communities of Taste in the Long 12th and Long 15th Centuries

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Organisers:John A. Geck, Records of Early English Drama / Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, Downtown
Jonathan Newman, English Department
Moderator/Chair:Claudia Wittig, Centre for Medieval Literature, Syddansk Universitet, Odense
Paper 641-aTaste Terms and Literary Community in 12th-Century Letters
(Language: English)
Jonathan Newman, English Department
Jonathan Newman, English Department
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Mentalities, Rhetoric, Social History
Paper 641-b'I pray god save the Duke of Bedford': Shaping and Presenting Self-Identity in the Salisbury Breviary (Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS lat. 17294)
(Language: English)
Orly Amit, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University
Orly Amit, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Painting, Lay Piety, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 641-cEncountering the Exotic in Yorkshire: Traces of Taste and Taste-Making in the Lincoln Thornton Manuscript (Lincoln Cathedral Library, MS 91)
(Language: English)
John A. Geck, Records of Early English Drama / Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, Downtown
John A. Geck, Records of Early English Drama / Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, Downtown
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Geography and Settlement Studies, Language and Literature - Middle English, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

We offer an interdisciplinary and comparative panel on the material and lexical signifiers of elite identity in Western Europe from the 12th to 15th centuries. Our panel will bring examinations of the lexis of elite taste in clerical letters and romance together with a study of the opulent materiality of reliquaries to examine conceptions of luxury, artisanship, written style, and dress among the nobility, gentry, and clergy. Our panel draws together several threads of developing elite identity as communities of tastes across spatial and temporal boundaries.