IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 705: My Precious: Precious Objects in the Middle Ages, III

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Abby Armstrong, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
Nicole Corrigan, Department of Art History, Emory University
Moderator/Chair:Juliana Amorim Goskes, Department of History, New York University
Paper 705-aShowing Off: Materiality in Late Gothic Corpus Christi Processions
(Language: English)
Heather McCune Bruhn, Department of Art History, Pennsylvania State University
Heather McCune Bruhn, Department of Art History, Pennsylvania State University
Index terms: Art History - Decorative Arts, Liturgy, Social History
Paper 705-bEleanor of Provence Liked It and She Put a Ring on It: Queenship and Agency in the 13th-Century Wardrobe and Household Accounts
(Language: English)
Abby Armstrong, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
Abby Armstrong, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
Index terms: Administration, Politics and Diplomacy, Women's Studies
Paper 705-cReworking Treasures in Painted Chapels
(Language: English)
Laura Maria Somenzi, Department of Art History, Emory University / Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florenz
Laura Maria Somenzi, Department of Art History, Emory University / Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florenz
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - Decorative Arts, Art History - Painting
Abstract

Throughout the Middle Ages, precious materials were forged into works of art that played a central role in medieval life. Churches accumulated glimmering hoards of reliquaries. Royal inventories provide descriptions of jewellery and illuminated manuscripts that rarely survive. Nobles and ecclesiastics exchanged exquisite gifts to forge bonds or make political statements. This panel explores the political uses of precious objects. These papers examine the status and materiality of late-medieval Corpus Christi processions, Eleanor of Provence’s patronage and female agency, and the inclusion of depictions of treasury objects in 15th-century painted chapels in Italy.