IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 712: Using and Not Using the Past in the Transformation of the Carolingian World, III: Negotiating Communities

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:HERA Project 'After Empire: Using & Not Using the Past in the Crisis of the Carolingian World' / Transformation of the Carolingian World Network
Organiser:Alice Hicklin, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Moderator/Chair:Levi Roach, Department of History, University of Exeter
Paper 712-aLaw, Kingship, and the Imperial Past in Sicily and Southern Italy
(Language: English)
Patrick Morgan, Department of History, University of California, Los Angeles
Patrick Morgan, Department of History, University of California, Los Angeles
Patrick Morgan, Department of History, University of California, Los Angeles
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Law, Political Thought
Paper 712-bSaxon Rebel, Slavic March: Wichmann the Younger and the Limits of Ottonian Power in the 10th-Century Baltic
(Language: English)
Chris Halsted, Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia
Chris Halsted, Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia
Chris Halsted, Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia
Index terms: Administration, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 712-cSpanish March and Carolingian Monarchy in the 10th Century
(Language: English)
Cullen Chandler, Department of History, Lycoming College, Pennsylvania
Cullen Chandler, Department of History, Lycoming College, Pennsylvania
Cullen Chandler, Department of History, Lycoming College, Pennsylvania
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

In the 10th and 11th centuries, communities across the former Carolingian Empire and beyond negotiated, reassessed, and asserted their own identities and networks in ways that both reflected on the past and looked to the future. These three papers each consider group identities in different contexts that offer varied perspectives on regional rulers, elites and ‘othering’. The session breaches boundaries between secular and ecclesiastic and east and west to pose broader questions about post-Carolingian identity and community’.