IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 715: Materiality of Death, III

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Institut für Geschichte, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Organiser:Romedio Schmitz-Esser, Abteilung für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Historisches Seminar, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Moderator/Chair:Romedio Schmitz-Esser, Abteilung für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Historisches Seminar, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Paper 715-aTombs and Tomb Inscriptions as a Way of Memorialising Patronage
(Language: English)
Gabriel Byng, Clare Hall, University of Cambridge
Gabriel Byng, Clare Hall, University of Cambridge
Gabriel Byng, Clare Hall, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - General, Epigraphy, Lay Piety
Paper 715-bHumilitas versus Revenants: The Interpretation of Prone Burials in Archaeological Research
(Language: English)
Amelie Alterauge, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Universität Bern
Amelie Alterauge, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Universität Bern
Amelie Alterauge, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Universität Bern
Index terms: Anthropology, Archaeology - General, Lay Piety, Religious Life
Paper 715-cNature and Death in Hugo of Trimberg's Renner
(Language: English)
Sandra Hofert, Deutsches Institut, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Sandra Hofert, Deutsches Institut, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Sandra Hofert, Deutsches Institut, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Index terms: Language and Literature - German, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Literacy and Orality, Mentalities
Abstract

Using an interdisciplinary approach, these three sessions discuss the relationship between material culture and death, currently intensely debated in archaeology, medieval history, and literary studies. Inviting junior as well as senior researchers, the sessions aim at opening up perspectives on the topic across cultural, religious, and geographic borders, which remain overemphasised in current research. This particular session combines the use of epigraphy in medieval art sponsoring, an anthropological re-evaluation of prone burials, and the relationship between the concepts of nature and death in a prominent example of late-medieval German advice literature.