IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 741: Passed over Manuscripts and Forgotten Social Transformations during the Reigns of Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Mary Blanchard, Department of History, Ave Maria University, Florida
Christopher Riedel, Department of History, Albion College, Michigan
Moderator/Chair:Mary Blanchard, Department of History, Ave Maria University, Florida
Paper 741-aThe Materiality of Reform: Re-Examining the Benedictine Context of English Caroline Minuscule
(Language: English)
Colleen Curran, Faculty of English Literature & Language, University of Oxford
Colleen Curran, Faculty of English Literature & Language, University of Oxford
Colleen Curran, Faculty of English Literature & Language, University of Oxford
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Monasticism
Paper 741-b'Eallum folce, ge yldrum ge gingrum': Social Transformation during the Reigns of Edmund, Eadred, and Eadwig, 939-959
(Language: English)
Stuart Pracy, Department of History, University of Manchester
Stuart Pracy, Department of History, University of Manchester
Stuart Pracy, Department of History, University of Manchester
Index terms: Daily Life, Law, Social History
Abstract

Edmund (r.939-946), Eadred (r.946-955), and Eadwig (r.955-959) ruled parts or all of England for twenty years, yet they are often ignored in favor of the men who came before or after them with little research being dedicated to these kings in their own right. But how did the English kingdom develop from Æthelstan, arguably the first king of England, to the imperial coronation and Benedictine Reform of Edgar’s reign? This session aims to bring the reigns of these often passed-over kings into the light through the re-examination of specific manuscripts produced during this period and a new approach to Anglo-Saxon social status. The papers focus on these ‘lost’ twenty years and will aid in the development of a clearer picture of these decades. Together they will both illuminate our understanding of this understudied period and create a more unified view of the century between Alfred and Æthelred.