IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 745: The Materiality of Cities in Medieval German Literature

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Christoph Pretzer, Department of German & Dutch, University of Cambridge
Moderator/Chair:Sarah Bowden, Department of German, King's College London
Paper 745-aA Collection of Columns in the Kaiserchronik's City of Rome
(Language: English)
Christoph Pretzer, Department of German & Dutch, University of Cambridge
Christoph Pretzer, Department of German & Dutch, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - German
Paper 745-bThe Cityscapes in Herzog Ernst B and Konrad von Würzburg's Partonopier und Meliur
(Language: English)
Margit Dahm-Kruse, Germanistisches Seminar, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel
Margit Dahm-Kruse, Germanistisches Seminar, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - German
Paper 745-cFrom Cities to Kingdoms: The Transformation of Ancient Urban City Spaces in the Apollonius von Tyrland by Heinrich von Neustadt
(Language: English)
Lea Braun, Institut für deutsche Literatur, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Lea Braun, Institut für deutsche Literatur, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - German
Abstract

This session will examine the depiction and discussion of cityscapes and urban sites, structures, or spaces in medieval German literature. From the anonymous Kaiserchronik’s curious collection of columns in ancient Rome, over the marvellous but empty cityscapes of the equally anonymous Herzog Ernst and Konrad von Würzburgs Patronopier and Meliur, to the medieval transformation of ancient cities in Heinrich von Neustadt’s Apollonius von Tyrland: Middle High German Literature from the 12th to the 14th century developed a rich tableau of engaging with the materiality of urban sites and cityscapes. The session will show how cities were presented and analysed as more than the sum of their material components but at the same time how important urban materiality was for the medieval imagination of cities.