IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 748: Centre and Periphery: The Papacy and Europe, c. 1100-1300

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Benedict Wiedemann, Department of History, University College London / Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Agata Zielinska, Department of History, University College London
Moderator/Chair:Emma Zürcher, Department of History, University College London
Paper 748-aPeriphery at the Centre: Cardinal Intermediaries for the Kings of England at the Papal Court, c. 1210-1227
(Language: English)
Benedict Wiedemann, Department of History, University College London / Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Benedict Wiedemann, Department of History, University College London / Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Index terms: Administration, Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 748-bOne Legate, Many Missions: Papal Legates with Multiple Missions in East Central Europe in the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Agata Zielinska, Department of History, University College London
Agata Zielinska, Department of History, University College London
Index terms: Administration, Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 748-cA 'Portuguese' Antipope in Rome: Maurice 'Bourdin' / Gregory VIII's Supporters in the Urbs, 1118-1121
(Language: English)
Francesco Renzi, Centro de Investigação Transdisciplinar 'Cultura, Espaço e Memória' (CITCEM), Universidade do Porto
Francesco Renzi, Centro de Investigação Transdisciplinar 'Cultura, Espaço e Memória' (CITCEM), Universidade do Porto
Index terms: Administration, Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The papacy had authority in all of Latin Christendom. Understandably, the realities of papal power varied depending on location and time. This panel will address the relationships that the papacy (individual popes, the papal curia, cardinals) had with the realms of England, Poland, and Portugal. With this focus on more distant lands, the physicality of the relationships as well as their dynamics will contribute to the ever-expanding scholarship on the functioning of the medieval papacy. This will also illustrate how these peripheral polities and provinces forced the papacy to change to accommodate these new relationships.