IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 806: Considering Power in 14th- and Early 15th-Century England

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Society for 14th-Century Studies
Organiser:James Bothwell, School of History, University of Leicester
Moderator/Chair:W. Mark Ormrod, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Paper 806-aA Class Apart?: The 14th-Century Parliamentary Burgesses
(Language: English)
Gwilym Dodd, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Gwilym Dodd, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Gwilym Dodd, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Index terms: Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 806-bThe Conciliar Assumption of the Royal Prerogative in Henry VI’s Minority, 1422-1437
(Language: English)
Jennifer Caddick, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Jennifer Caddick, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Jennifer Caddick, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Index terms: Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 806-cThe Chronicle of John Strecche
(Language: English)
Chris Given-Wilson, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Chris Given-Wilson, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Chris Given-Wilson, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This session looks at the changing nature of political power in later medieval England. Dodd considers the place of representatives of the boroughs and towns in the House of Commons, what united and divided them, as well as their overall remit within parliament. Caddick then moves on to examine the ideological and practical impact of the regency control of part of the royal prerogative- the distribution of patronage to the gentry- on the stability of Henry VI’s minority. Finally, Given-Wilson looks at the view of such political processes and events through the lens of the underused Chronicle of John Strecche.