IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 809: National Identity and Medieval History Writing, IV: Patriotism and War

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Henry Marsh, Department of History, University of Exeter
Trevor Russell Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Andy King, Department of History, University of Southampton
Paper 809-aRevisiting Minot: Nationalist versus Poet
(Language: English)
David Matthews, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
David Matthews, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Middle English, Mentalities, Political Thought
Paper 809-bNational Behaviour on the Battlefield: Insights into the Identity Discourse of Chroniclers, 1100-1500
(Language: English)
Pierre Courroux, British Academy / Department of History, University of Southampton
Pierre Courroux, British Academy / Department of History, University of Southampton
Index terms: Mentalities, Military History, Political Thought
Paper 809-cArms, Armour, and Poet: National Identity in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
(Language: English)
Michael Livingston, Department of English, The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina
Michael Livingston, Department of English, The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Middle English, Mentalities, Military History
Abstract

This series of four sessions examines the relationship between concepts of ethnic and national identity in the historical literature of the Middle Ages. Papers in this session explore how medieval historical writers addressed national identity in the varied contexts of warfare and conflict. The first paper challenges how historians have criticised the English poet Laurence Minot for his nationalism, which itself has often been said to be an impossibility in his 14th-century contexts, and offers new conclusions about Minot’s place in the later Richardian efflorescence. The second paper explores the common topoi of nationhood in chroniclers’ narratives of battle, both those of chroniclers’ own nations and those of other nations, to better understand the rhetoric of war. The final paper offers a consideration of how the poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight tapped into the nationalist impulses of the present, especially in its depictions of arms and armour.