IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 822: Materialities at Birkbeck, III: Dwelling in Medieval Landscapes across Text, Material, Space

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
Organiser:Kathryn Franklin, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Caroline Goodson, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Paper 822-aInscribed Landscapes and Unwritten Subjects: Medieval Spaces in Vayots Dzor, Armenia
(Language: English)
Kathryn Franklin, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
Kathryn Franklin, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Daily Life, Epigraphy, Historiography - Modern Scholarship
Paper 822-bLandscape as a Mnemonic for Social Values, Relationships, and Structures across the Longue Durée, c. 400-1300: Examples from Cambridgeshire
(Language: English)
Susan Oosthuizen, Institute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge
Susan Oosthuizen, Institute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Daily Life, Geography and Settlement Studies, Law
Paper 822-cThe Terroir of Vice or Virtue: Belonging and Religious Conversion in Mewat, North India
(Language: English)
Mudit Trivedi, Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago
Mudit Trivedi, Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Architecture - General, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Religious Life
Abstract

This panel enquires into the modes of our re/construction of medieval imagined landscapes as mediated by material data, including texts, architectural inscriptions, artistic depictions, maps, and objects, as well as built, managed, and dwelled-in spaces. As we disciplinarily embrace a global medieval as a scale of study, a starting point is thinking through the material mechanisms by which people in the medieval period (defined expansively as the 5th through the 15th centuries AD) imagined their worlds, and imagined themselves within those worlds. How do spaces and landscapes defined through law, practice, cosmography and/or narrative variably constitute medieval subjects?