IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 837: Times of Gold and Iron: Ceremonies, Objects, and Meanings in the Medieval Mediterranean, 10th-13th Centuries, II

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Javier Albarrán-Iruela, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Francisco Lopez-Santos Kornberger, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Moderator/Chair:Maria Parani, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Cyprus
Paper 837-aThe Road to the Throne: Kingship's Symbols and Ceremonies according to 12th- and 13th-Century Castilo-Leonese Chronicles
(Language: English)
Diego Rodríguez-Peña Sainz de la Maza, Departamento de Historia Antigua, Historia Medieval y Paleografía y Diplomática, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Diego Rodríguez-Peña Sainz de la Maza, Departamento de Historia Antigua, Historia Medieval y Paleografía y Diplomática, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Index terms: Language and Literature - Spanish or Portuguese, Political Thought
Paper 837-b'Replacing the purple with rags': Repudiating the Imperial Attire in 11th-Century Byzantine Historical Accounts
(Language: English)
Francisco Lopez-Santos Kornberger, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Francisco Lopez-Santos Kornberger, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Language and Literature - Greek, Mentalities, Political Thought
Paper 837-cInheritance, Power, and Legitimacy: The Ceremony of Bay'a in al-Andalus, 10th-13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Alejandro Peláez Martín, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Alejandro Peláez Martín, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Index terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies, Liturgy, Political Thought
Abstract

Gifts, ceremonies and regalia were crucial elements in both expressing and enhancing power relations in the Medieval past. They were cultural products but also a framework for innovation. This double session analyses the materiality of power through ceremonies and meaningful objects across the Mediterranean world, from Iberia to Byzantium, in times of coexistence and exchange, but also conflict, among communities. Through the analysis of a range of material and literary sources, speakers explore the role of rituals and objects used to underline their status and exemplify authority to their audiences.