IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 841: Texts as Material Culture: Documents, Copies, and Political Life

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Moderator/Chair:Sébastien Barret, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Paper 841-aKeeping Sancho 'the Brave' Alive: The Importance of Copies for the Conservation of Medieval Documentation
(Language: English)
Miriam Fernández Pérez, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Cantabria
Miriam Fernández Pérez, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Cantabria
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 841-b'Una mattina del bel mese maggio': Anonymous Poems Discovered in Gemona
(Language: English)
Federico Guariglia, Dipartimento di Scienze Umane, Università degli Studi di Verona / École Practique des Hautes Études (EPHE), Paris
Federico Guariglia, Dipartimento di Scienze Umane, Università degli Studi di Verona / École Practique des Hautes Études (EPHE), Paris
Index terms: Language and Literature - Italian, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Paper -a:
One of the greatest qualities of a document is that it allows the past to be kept alive, allowing it to last throughout time for historians to have at their disposal. Nevertheless, there is a quandary: the manuscript, as an object, is submitted to the continuous threats caused by the passage of centuries. In the case of the documentation of Sancho IV (Castile, 1258-1295) we must emphasize that a large quantity has been preserved thanks to copies conducted subsequently which are preserved in the archives. That is why the phenomenon of originals and copies is relevant when we talk about documental preservation.

Paper -b:
This paper aims to analyze a series of four Italian anonymous poems that were discovered in a medieval account manuscript: the reason why these poems were re-use as cover is strictly connected with their politic content. In fact, the two sonnets, the ballad and the stanza were dedicated to the doge of Pisa, Giovanni dell’Agnello, peculiar and short-lived character into the politic life of Pisa. Finally, I would study the way that the parchment had arrived from Pisa to Friuli, probably brought by exiles Tuscans.