IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 852: Social and Cultural Dimensions of Exchange

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Frederik Vognsen Hansen, Institut for Kultur og Samfund, Aarhus Universitet
Moderator/Chair:Thomas Heebøll-Holm, Institut for Historie, Syddansk Universitet, Odense
Paper 852-aNarrating Gifts
(Language: English)
Lars Kjær, Department of History, New College of the Humanities, London
Lars Kjær, Department of History, New College of the Humanities, London
Lars Kjær, Department of History, New College of the Humanities, London
Index terms: Anthropology, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Middle English, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 852-bOf 'Theft' and 'Rapine': Or, How Crimes Were Defined by Their Actors, Rather than by Their Actions
(Language: English)
Frederik Vognsen Hansen, Institut for Kultur og Samfund, Aarhus Universitet
Frederik Vognsen Hansen, Institut for Kultur og Samfund, Aarhus Universitet
Frederik Vognsen Hansen, Institut for Kultur og Samfund, Aarhus Universitet
Index terms: Anthropology, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Law, Social History
Paper 852-cCredit, Commodification, and Criminalization: Taking, Giving, and Markets in the Southern Baltic, 15th to 16th Century
(Language: English)
Philipp Höhn, Sonderforschungsbereich 1095 'Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Philipp Höhn, Sonderforschungsbereich 1095 'Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Philipp Höhn, Sonderforschungsbereich 1095 'Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Index terms: Anthropology, Economics - Trade, Maritime and Naval Studies, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This session investigates giving gifts and seizing objects as social and cultural practices. Lars Kjær investigates the ways in which the meaning of gifts was constructed and creatively transformed by medieval writers. The paper focuses on four rings from Innocent III to Richard I of England and their complex later history. Frederik Lynge Vognsen examines how, in late medieval Denmark, different narratives associated with theft and rapine resulted in different legal conduct depending on who committed the crime. Philipp Höhn investigates how seized objects were characterized by reciprocal social relations. This meant that they were both intertwined in the social relations of the former owners and other people claiming ownership: they had a complex and contested history.