IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 854: Medieval Materialities and Modern Technologies: New Research Directions, II

Tuesday 2 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC), Universität Hamburg
Organiser:Stefano Valente, Sonderforschungsbereich 950 'Manuskriptkulturen in Asien, Afrika und Europa', Universität Hamburg
Moderator/Chair:Hanna M. Wimmer, Sonderforschungsbereich 950 'Manuskriptkulturen in Asien, Afrika und Europa' / Kunstgeschichtliches Seminar, Universität Hamburg
Paper 854-aMaterial Science Methods for Reconstructing the History of Manuscripts
(Language: English)
Olivier Bonnerot, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Berlin
Olivier Bonnerot, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Berlin
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 854-bThe Interdisciplinary Alchemist: Reproduction and Study of Black Inks from the Islamicate World
(Language: English)
Claudia Colini, Sonderforschungsbereich 950 'Manuskriptkulturen in Asien, Afrika und Europa', Universität Hamburg / Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Berlin
Claudia Colini, Sonderforschungsbereich 950 'Manuskriptkulturen in Asien, Afrika und Europa', Universität Hamburg / Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Berlin
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 854-cInk and Colour Identification in Medieval Music Manuscripts
(Language: English)
Andreas Janke, Sonderforschungsbereich 950 'Manuskriptkulturen in Asien, Afrika und Europa', Universität Hamburg
Andreas Janke, Sonderforschungsbereich 950 'Manuskriptkulturen in Asien, Afrika und Europa', Universität Hamburg
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Music
Abstract

In two sessions, members and associates of the Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC) in Hamburg present recent collaborative research by scientists from STEM subjects and scholars of the humanities that bridges the gap between humanities and the natural sciences and sheds new light on our understanding of medieval material culture, both within and beyond Europe. How can, for instance, ink and pigment analysis, DNA analysis and multispectral imaging help with the recovery of script, the dating and placing of manuscripts, and the understanding of practices of production and use of manuscripts? What new questions arise from these collaborations? What is the potential, what are the challenges of such fundamentally interdisciplinary research?