IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1028: Linguistic Borderlands, Speaking about Boundaries, I: Distance, Proximity, and Adjacent Languages

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Organisers:Roderick McDonald, Independent Scholar, Sheffield
Christine Wallis, School of English, University of Sheffield
Moderator/Chair:Mark J. Faulkner, School of English Literature, Language & Linguistics, University of Sheffield
Paper 1028-aDelineating the Geographic and Phonological Boundaries of Old West Norse: Reconsidering the Differentiation between Old Icelandic and Old Norwegian in Reynistaðarbók AM 764 4to
(Language: English)
Patrick Aaron Farrugia, Institutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1028-b'Ok var ufridr i morgum lutum': Late Medieval Icelandic-Norwegian Linguistic Relations
(Language: English)
Katrín Lísa van der Linde, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies University of Iceland Reykjavík
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1028-cHow Far Did the Prestige of 'Parisian' French Influence the French of England?
(Language: English)
Richard Ingham, School of English, Birmingham City University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - French or Occitan
Abstract

This panel examines boundaries between closely-related medieval languages, both linguistically and geographically, and the implications for how we understand the shared and differentiated characteristics of such languages. Both Farrugia and van der Linde examine the relationship between Old Icelandic and Old Norwegian, while Ingham negotiates the interaction of medieval ‘Parisian’ French with the French spoken in England.