IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1051: Early Medieval English in the Modern Age, I: Global and Fictional Perspectives on Old English Afterlives

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Organisers:Thijs Porck, Centre for the Arts in Society, Universiteit Leiden
Oliver M. Traxel, Institutt for kultur- og språkvitenskap, Universitetet i Stavanger
Moderator/Chair:Rachel Fletcher, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow
Paper 1051-a'Der Mann gehört uns an': King Alfred's Operatic Afterlife and the Pan-Germanic Movement
(Language: English)
Ryan Hall, Centre for Medieval Studies University of Toronto
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Music, Performance Arts - Drama
Paper 1051-bWulf and Eadwacer in 1830 New Zealand
(Language: English)
Martina Marzullo, Anglistisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Old English, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 1051-cRe-Imagining Early Medieval Britain
(Language: English)
Karen L. Jolly, Department of History, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Abstract

This is the first of two sessions on ‘Early Medieval English in the Modern Age: Old English across Temporal Borders’, which focusses on how scholars, poets, and literary authors have studied, translated and recreated Old English since 1500. Paper-a presents the impact and context of operas centered on the life Alfred the Great in 19th-century Germany. Paper-b considers Hamish Clayton’s Wulf (2012), a novel based on the Old English poem Wulf and Eadwacer but set in a New Zealand context. Paper-c looks at the roles of historical fiction and fantasy literature in creating an image of early medieval Britain.