IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 113: Conceptualising Borders in the Middle Ages, I: Kinship, Culture, and Kingdom

Monday 6 July 2020, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Medieval & Ancient Research Centre (MARCUS), University of Sheffield
Organisers:James Chetwood, Department of History, University of Sheffield
Harry Mawdsley, Department of History, University of Sheffield
Moderator/Chair:Charles West, Department of History, University of Sheffield
Paper 113-aBlood and Bone?: Defining the Borders of Kinship in Early Medieval England
(Language: English)
Alex Traves, Department of History, University of Sheffield
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Law, Social History
Paper 113-bPerceptions and Construction of Cultural Boundaries in Early Medieval Lindsey
(Language: English)
Katie Libby, Department of Archaeology University of Sheffield
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Daily Life
Paper 113-cStrangers in Strange Lands: Forced Movement and Punishment within and without the Post-Roman Regna
(Language: English)
Harry Mawdsley, Department of History, University of Sheffield
Index terms: Law, Social History
Abstract

How did medieval communities create and preserve social, physical and metaphorical boundaries? These three papers will use a range of evidence and methodological approaches to examine how boundaries at state, community, and familial levels were used to forge identities, exclude outsiders, and cement social positions. The speakers will explore how these boundaries affected daily life in the early medieval period, illustrating how kinship was defined and conceptualised in Anglo-Saxon England, how dress accessories were used to display identity in the Kingdom of Lindsey, and how post-Roman legislators and judges punished offenders by transporting them across political and geographical borders.