IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1143: Borders that Bind, II: Connected Cities in the Later Medieval Holy Roman Empire

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Regesta Imperii
Organiser:Ben Pope, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester
Moderator/Chair:Ulla Kypta, Historisches Seminar, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Paper 1143-aConnecting the Dots: The German Hanse as a Cross-Border Institution in Northern Europe
(Language: English)
Angela Huang, Forschungsstelle für die Geschichte der Hanse und des Ostseeraums, Lübeck
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1143-bStones, Tolls, and Unicorns: Trading Wax and Connecting Communities in the Hansa
(Language: English)
Mark Whelan, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1143-cBoundaries and Connections between 'Town' and 'Nobility' in 15th-Century Upper Germany
(Language: English)
Ben Pope, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester
Index terms: Economics - Rural, Economics - Urban, Military History, Social History
Abstract

The Holy Roman Empire of the later Middle Ages witnessed a proliferation of borders and boundaries, as delimited and sometimes enclosed communities and institutions combined and coexisted with highly decentralized and fragmented political authority. But many of these boundaries went hand-in-hand with intensified ‘cross-border’ connections. This session will explore cities as inherently bounded spaces which are equally defined by their connectedness. Papers will examine the interplay of political and economic networks and the interaction of these connections with antagonism and conflict between social groups, comparing two regions with highly developed urban networks: the Baltic, and Upper Germany.