IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1145: Borders of the Possible: Exploring Conceptual Boundaries in Old Norse-Icelandic Literature, II - Translation and Transformation

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Old Norse Network of Otherness (ONNO)
Organiser:Rebecca Merkelbach, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Moderator/Chair:Ann Sheffield, Department of Chemistry, Allegheny College, Pennsylvania
Paper 1145-a'I sit alone and tell my sorrow': Emotion and the Generic Boundaries of the 'Post-Classical' Íslendingasögur
(Language: English)
Rebecca Merkelbach, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Mentalities
Paper 1145-b'Einn madvr eigi allitill': A Study on the Effect of Translation on the Old Norse Supernatural Concept of the Jǫtnar
(Language: English)
Felix Lummer, School of Social Sciences University of Iceland Reykjavík
Index terms: Folk Studies, Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Pagan Religions
Paper 1145-cA Wolf in Human Clothing: Physical and Behavioural Lycanthropy in Old Norse Literature
(Language: English)
Mario Martín Páez, Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociología Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Index terms: Anthropology, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Mentalities, Social History
Abstract

Situated in the context of new research into medieval Icelandic literature and culture that challenges long-held notions of binary opposition, this series of sessions intends to open up inquiry into the existence – or absence – and the nature (fixedness, permeability) of boundaries relating to gender, generic and ontological transformation, the construction of identity and alterity, and geography, culture, and the natural world, as they are depicted, interrogated, problematised across Old Norse-Icelandic literature. This second session poses questions about the translation of concepts and characters across different genres, languages, and even species, and the way they are transformed in the crossing of these boundaries.