IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1205: Neglected Narratives of the Early Crusade Movement

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:History Department, Rugby School
Organiser:Thomas William Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Helen J. Nicholson, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Paper 1205-aNew Manuscripts of 'Bartolf of Nangis'
(Language: English)
Thomas William Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Crusades, Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1205-bAfter Ascalon: 'Bartolf of Nangis' on the Early Years of the Kingdom of Jerusalem
(Language: English)
Susan B. Edgington, School of History, Queen Mary, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1205-cLisiard of Tours and the Early History of the Latin East
(Language: English)
Andrew David Buck, School of History, Queen Mary University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Latin
Abstract

The papers in this session will explore neglected narratives of the First Crusade and the early crusade movement, namely the abbreviated version of Fulcher of Chartres’ Historia traditionally attributed to ‘Bartolf of Nangis’; and Lisiard of Tours’ continuation of Baldric of Bourgeuil’s Historia Ierosolimitana. Paper A will present new manuscripts of ‘Bartolf of Nangis’ and the first findings from a new critical edition and translation of the text being made with Dr Susan Edgington. Paper B looks at the content of the later part of the ‘Bartolf’ text, comparing it with the same section of Fulcher’s extant recension, and comments on its use to continue accounts of the First Crusade by later copyists of Baldric of Bourgueil and Robert the Monk. Paper C examines a relatively little studied narrative of the opening decades of Latin settlement in the East: Lisiard of Tours’ (c. 1150) continuation of Baldric of Bourgeuil’s Historia Ierosolimitana. It offers some preliminary thoughts on this text’s content, its purpose, and its relationship to other early narratives of the Latin East.