IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1206: Lending, Recording, and Collecting Debts in Medieval Europe, I: Private Credit

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:DFG Project 'Small-Scale Credit & Market Participation in the Later Middle Ages'
Organisers:Stephan Köhler, Historisches Institut, Universität Mannheim
Tony Moore, International Capital Market Association (ICMA) Centre, University of Reading
Moderator/Chair:Tony Moore, International Capital Market Association (ICMA) Centre, University of Reading
Paper 1206-aHow Imbreviaturae of Notaries Can Help to Reconstruct Medieval Credit Markets: The Case of Tirol in the 13th and 14th Centuries
(Language: English)
Stephan Köhler, Historisches Institut, Universität Mannheim
Index terms: Administration, Archives and Sources, Economics - General, Economics - Rural
Paper 1206-bThe Clerics of St Paul's Cathedral as Protagonists on the Late Medieval Credit Market
(Language: English)
Markus Schniggendiller, Historisches Institut Universität Mannheim
Index terms: Administration, Archives and Sources, Economics - General, Economics - Urban
Paper 1206-cPractices of Lending, Borrowing, and Debt Settlement in the Lower-Rhine Cities of Wesel, Kalkar, and Bocholt during the Late Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Monika Gussone, Historisches Institut Universität Mannheim
Index terms: Administration, Archives and Sources, Economics - General, Economics - Urban
Abstract

Different types of sources (court records, city accounts, inventories, notarial registers) are used in this session to describe the private credit medieval Tirol, London, and the Lower Rhine region. The analysis of these sources for debt recording and collecting demonstrates that the medieval credit market was vivid and encompassed large parts of the population, ranging from the nobility to urban citizens, peasants, and clerics. Several institutions were used by people of different social backgrounds to contract, secure, or collect debts. However, unlike public credit institutions most of the institutions used for private credits did not serve credits transactions alone and were so far often neglected.