IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1237: The Defence and Expansion of 'Borders' in Three Different 12th-Century Mediterranean Contexts

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Northern Network for the Study of the Crusades
Organiser:Jason T. Roche, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Moderator/Chair:Jason T. Roche, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Paper 1237-aVolatile Frontiers: King Baldwin III of Jerusalem's Intervention in the Northern 'Crusader States'
(Language: English)
Allison Emond, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Crusades, Military History
Paper 1237-b'Mind the Gap': Reassessing the Apparent Omission of Sicily in the Jerusalemite Appeal to the West in the 1180s
(Language: English)
Paula Hailstone, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Military History
Paper 1237-cNorman and Anglo-Norman Perspectives on the Iberian Frontier
(Language: English)
Lucas Villegas-Aristiz√°bal, Bader International Study Centre, Herstmonceux Castle, Queen's University, Ontario
Index terms: Crusades, Military History
Abstract

This is the second of two sessions sponsored by the Northern Network for the Study of the Crusades that focuses on the special thematic strand of ‘borders’ addresses the defense and expansion of ‘borders’ in three different 12th-century Mediterranean contexts. Allison Emond explores King Baldwin III of Jerusalem’s various interventions in the northern states of Outremer and argues that his presence in the border regions between the so-called ‘crusader states’ shaped the future of the entire Christian presence in the Levant. Paula Hailstone explores the possible reasons why the Jerusalemite delegation sent West in 1184 to seek military assistance to help defend its ‘borders’ from the threat posed to them by Salah al-Din neglected to approach the court of King William II of Sicily. Lucas Villegas-Aristiz√°bal examines a collection of Norman and Anglo-Norman narratives to reveal how their respective authors interpreted and represented the Christian-Muslim conflict in the fluid borderlands of Iberia.