IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1303: Transformation and Creativity in the Face of Conquest: Poetics, History, Cosmology

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval Literature, University of Southern Denmark / University of York
Organiser:Divna Manolova, Department of Philology, University of Silesia, Katowice
Moderator/Chair:George Younge, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
Paper 1303-aPoetic Transformations and the Chronicling of History in Conquest England: 'The Death of Edward' (1066) and ‘The Death of William' (1086)
(Language: English)
Elizabeth M. Tyler, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Old English
Paper 1303-bLatin Learning in Crisis: Cosmology, Rhetoric, and Conquest in Stephen of Antioch, c. 1127
(Language: English)
Julian J. T. Yolles, Department of Classics, Harvard University
Index terms: Crusades, Language and Literature - Latin, Philosophy, Rhetoric
Paper 1303-cNew Borders and New Worlds: Nikephoros Blemmydes and the Teaching of Cosmology in Nicaea after 1204
(Language: English)
Divna Manolova, Department of Philology, University of Silesia, Katowice
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Education, Philosophy, Science
Abstract

Along with violent disruption, conquest brings new sources of knowledge, new languages and forms, and simultaneously re-evaluates and reactivates old forms, languages and traditions, thus reshaping and adapting existing cosmologies and worldviews. With an eye to the historiographies of the study of conquests, this session examines the impact of conquest on the poetry, historiography and learned culture across medieval Europe between the 11th and the 13th centuries. With the help of three comparative and contrasting case studies – the Norman conquest and the poetry of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles; the conquest of the Levant and Stephen of Antioch’s problematisation of Latinity; the conquest of Constantinople by the Crusaders in 1204 and Nikephoros Blemmydes’ scholarly view of the ‘new’ Byzantine world – we seek to explore the ways in which conquest entails the reordering of knowledge.