IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1306: Lending, Recording, and Collecting Debts in Medieval Europe, II: Public Credit

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:DFG Project 'Small-Scale Credit & Market Participation in the Later Middle Ages'
Organisers:Stephan Köhler, Historisches Institut, Universität Mannheim
Tony Moore, International Capital Market Association (ICMA) Centre, University of Reading
Moderator/Chair:Stephan Köhler, Historisches Institut, Universität Mannheim
Paper 1306-aHenry III's Debt Management in the 1250s
(Language: English)
Nick Barratt, ARTS Scheme, Surrey
Index terms: Administration, Economics - General, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1306-bThe First Sovereign Default?: Discounting Henry III's Debts after 1267
(Language: English)
Tony Moore, International Capital Market Association (ICMA) Centre, University of Reading
Index terms: Administration, Economics - General, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1306-cThe Long Life of Lincoln's Letters: Debt Management and Transfer, 1297-1336
(Language: English)
Robert Blackmore, Department of History, University of Southampton
Index terms: Administration, Archives and Sources, Economics - Trade, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1306-dPublic Finance and Royal Debts in Medieval England: The Repayment of the Crown's Domestic and Overseas Creditors, 1307-1377
(Language: English)
Robin McCallum, School of History & Anthropology, Queen's University Belfast
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This session reconstructs how English kings from Henry III to Edward III managed and repaid (or not) their debts. The first two papers show how Henry III accumulated massive debts and then negotiated settlements with his creditors after 1267. The third reveals how Edward I’s Gascon supporters pledged royal debts as collateral for their own private borrowing. A fourth paper examines how Edwards II and III used assignments on future revenues to provide security for repayment.