IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1350: Jews in Border Regions, II

Wednesday 8 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Institut für jüdische Geschichte Österreichs / American Academy of Research Historians of Medieval Spain (AARHMS)
Organiser:Birgit Wiedl, Institut für jüdische Geschichte Österreichs, St. Pölten
Moderator/Chair:Birgit Wiedl, Institut für jüdische Geschichte Österreichs, St. Pölten
Paper 1350-aGermania Slavica - Ashkelonia - Ashkenaz Kenaanit: The Expansion of the Ashkenazi Jews into the Germanic-Slavic Borderlands in the High and Late Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Rainer Josef Barzen, Institut für Jüdische Studien, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Local History, Religious Life
Paper 1350-bCrossing Borders in Times of Crisis: A Multi-Scale Analysis in the Medieval Crown of Aragon
(Language: English)
Claire Soussen Max, Université de Versailles - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Local History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1350-cFrom al-Andalus to Andalusia: Jewish Administrators in a Frontier Christian Kingdom
(Language: English)
Maya Soifer Irish, Department of History, Rice University, Texas
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Local History, Politics and Diplomacy, Religious Life
Paper 1350-dMarian Miracles and Toledot Tales: Jewish-Christian-Muslim Polemic from the Mediterranan to Ethiopia and Back Again
(Language: English)
Alexandra F. C. Cuffel, Centrum für Religionswissenschaftliche Studien, Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Religious Life
Abstract

This is the second of two sessions which aim at analyzing the living condition of Jews in border regions throughout Europe. Frontier regions with their specific political, economic, and social conditions posed challenges as well as chances for their inhabitants, and like their Christian counterparts, the Jews of these regions both coped with and took advantage of these unique conditions: they established business and family connections across the (often fluid) borders, sought refuge ‘on the other side’ in times of persecution, and exported their own cultural characteristics into their new homes, thereby influencing and transforming the already existing Jewish communities there.