IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 143: Reassessing the Boundaries of Kinship in the Late Middle Ages, I: Genoa, a Peculiar Case Study

Monday 6 July 2020, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:EU Marie Skłodowska-Curie Project (MSCA), 'Kinship, Alliance & Urban Space: The Genoese alberghi in the Late Middle Ages (c. 1150-c. 1450)' (GenALMA)
Organiser:Denise Bezzina, Centro interuniversitario di ricerca di storia del notariato (NOTARIORUM ITINERA), Università degli Studi di Genova
Moderator/Chair:Aysu Dinçer, Department of History, University of Warwick
Paper 143-aIs Blood Thicker than Water?: Reconsidering the Late Medieval Genoese Alberghi
(Language: English)
Denise Bezzina, Centro interuniversitario di ricerca di storia del notariato (NOTARIORUM ITINERA), Università degli Studi di Genova
Index terms: Daily Life, Social History
Paper 143-bThe Lords of the Hill: Three Urban Levels of Analysis of the Fieschi Family in Genoa - Blood Kinship, Political Faction, and Territorial Identity, 1378-1400
(Language: English)
Simone Lombardo, Dipartimento di Storia Archeologia e Storia dell'arte Università Cattolica di Milano
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Social History
Paper 143-cFrom Father to Son: Family Strategies among Notaries in 13th-Century Genoa
(Language: English)
Giovanna Maria Orlandi, Dipartimento di Antichità Filosofia e Storia Università degli Studi di Genova
Index terms: Daily Life, Social History
Abstract

When it comes to assessing the development of kinship structures and their boundaries, Genoa presents peculiar characteristics. This session aims at considering key developments in the city from three main perspectives. First, by considering the ‘alberghi’ – confederacies gathering several aristocratic families who decided to adopt a common surname and reside in closed districts – which had profound repercussions on society and on the urban fabric, establishing new limits to how kinship was understood. Secondly by focusing on one of these families, the Fieschi, and on their intra- and inter-familial relationships, their political and territorial strategies. Thirdly by looking at how family strategies worked among notaries, key figures in Genoese society, who showed a certain proclivity for keeping their profession within their families’ confines.