IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1514: Where West Meets East: The Contact Zones of Medieval Eurasian Studies

Thursday 9 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:National Research Foundation of Korea
Organiser:Kee-Hyun Ban, Reconciliation & Coexistence in the Contact Zones (RCCZ) Research Centre Chung-Ang University Seoul
Moderator/Chair:Yongku Cha, Reconciliation & Coexistence in the Contact Zones (RCCZ) Research Centre Chung-Ang University Seoul
Paper 1514-aWar and Partition: Armenia in the 5th Century and Korea in the 20th Century
(Language: English)
Kee-Hyun Ban, Reconciliation & Coexistence in the Contact Zones (RCCZ) Research Centre Chung-Ang University Seoul
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1514-bAcross the Eurasian Borders: Imagined Worlds in 14th-Century Western Europe
(Language: English)
Yong-Jin Hong, Department of History Education Korea University Seoul
Index terms: Daily Life, Language and Literature - Comparative, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1514-cThe Colonial Korea's Acceptance of Medieval Literature and Culture as the Image of Pre-Imperial Europe
(Language: English)
Woohyung Chon, Reconciliation & Coexistence in the Contact Zones (RCCZ) Research Centre Chung-Ang University Seoul
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Language and Literature - Comparative, Political Thought, Social History
Paper 1514-dA Comparative Study on the Development of Border Consciousness: Medieval German Ostmark and Chinese Bianzhou (邊州)
(Language: English)
Yongku Cha, Reconciliation & Coexistence in the Contact Zones (RCCZ) Research Centre Chung-Ang University Seoul
Chun-Bok Lee, Reconciliation & Coexistence in the Contact Zones (RCCZ) Research Centre, Chung-Ang University, Seoul
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - German, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The Reconciliation and Coexistence in Contact Zones (RCCZ) Research Centre is the only institute for Eurasian borderlands studies in South Korea, which is funded by the National Research Foundation of Korea. This session covers multiple themes of Medieval Eurasian borderlands or ‘Contact Zones’ (M. L. Pratt’s concept) between individuals, spaces and times. Kee-Hyun Ban (Paper-a) reveals historical parallels between the 5th-century Armenia and the 20th-century Korea in terms of war and partition. Yong-Jin Hong (Paper-b) explores the 14th-century western European literature to show imagined borders between western and eastern Eurasia. Woohyung Chon (Paper-c) investigates colonial Korea’s acceptance of medieval European literature and culture through the works of Sang Lee. Yongku Cha and Chun-Bok Lee (Paper-d) conduct a comparative study on medieval German Ostmark and Chinese Bianzhou (邊州) to clarify the development of their border consciousness.