IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1530: 'Administrateurs sans Frontières': Transnational Governance and Administration in 13th-Century Britain and Ireland

Thursday 9 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol
Organiser:Dan Booker, Department of History, University of Bristol
Moderator/Chair:Sophie Ambler, Independent Scholar, London
Paper 1530-aOn the Margins: The Exchequer of Ireland and Transnational Administration, 1199-1216
(Language: English)
Dan Booker, Department of History, University of Bristol
Index terms: Administration, Political Thought
Paper 1530-bBordering on the Impossible?: Examining Chancery Perceptions of the Various Provinces and Their Borders under King John's Rule, 1199-1206
(Language: English)
Edward Woodhouse, School of History, University of East Anglia
Index terms: Administration, Political Thought
Paper 1530-cEmpire State-Building: English Governance in 13th-Century Ireland
(Language: English)
Colin Veach, School of Histories, Languages & Cultures, University of Hull
Index terms: Administration, Political Thought
Abstract

The administrative officers and institutions of Britain and Ireland in the 13th century frequently worked across and within the borders between contemporary polities. Yet the borders around and within these polities were complex, and officials and institutions habitually worked in a personal context, often serving a particular individual rather than a specific place or space. These personal relationships defined how medieval administrators and institutions operated; however, their duties often found them working across or within borders and liminal zones created by the places and spaces in which they worked. This session will examine how the concept of borders can be explored in an administrative and institutional context. This session will explore how medieval administrators and institutions perceived these ‘borders’ and how their work may have shaped (or been shaped by) those same borders. By examining how administrators and institutions operated across borders, in territories located within liminal zones, and on the margins of their respective societies, we hope to approach the governance and administration of Britain and Ireland from new and exciting angles.