IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 158: Anglo-British Borders in the Early Middle Ages, I: The Welsh and the English

Monday 6 July 2020, 11.15-12.45

Organisers:Ben Guy, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Clare Stancliffe, Department of History, Durham University
Moderator/Chair:Alex Woolf, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Paper 158-aMercia, Northumbria, and the Britons in the 7th Century: A Re-Examination of the Welsh Evidence
(Language: English)
Rebecca Thomas, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Latin, Political Thought
Paper 158-bBoundaries of the Mind: Naming Other Peoples in Early Medieval Britain
(Language: English)
Katrin Thier, Oxford English Dictionary Oxford University Press
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin, Social History
Paper 158-cPlace-Names and Wat's Dyke
(Language: English)
David Parsons, Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, Aberystwyth University
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Old English, Onomastics
Abstract

The first session in this series focuses on the relationship between the Britons of Wales and the Anglo-Saxons, with Thomas’s paper investigating the Welsh poetic evidence and how this presents cross-border interaction, complemented by Thier’s paper approaching the topic from an English linguistic perspective and examining the Old English usage of the terms ‘British’ versus ‘Welsh’, while Parsons examines both Welsh and English place-names along the line of Wat’s Dyke, which may have formed (or followed) an early medieval Anglo-Welsh boundary.