IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1638: Reconsidering the Boundaries of Religious Dissent in the Long 12th Century, I

Thursday 9 July 2020, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Organisers:Rachel Ernst, Department of History, Georgia State University
Stamatia Noutsou, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Moderator/Chair:Delfi-Isabel Nieto-Isabel, Departament d'Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona
Paper 1638-aBlazing Words in Sulfury Tongues: Heresy as a Symptom of Ecclesiastical Corruption
(Language: English)
Rachel Ernst, Department of History, Georgia State University
Index terms: Monasticism, Religious Life, Sermons and Preaching, Women's Studies
Paper 1638-bReform, Dissent, and the Monasticisation of the World in Geoffrey of Auxerre's Polemical Sermons
(Language: English)
Stamatia Noutsou, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Index terms: Monasticism, Religious Life, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 1638-cAlan of Lille Preaching against Heresy: Topics and Techniques
(Language: English)
Anne Greule, Historische Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Index terms: Religious Life, Rhetoric, Sermons and Preaching
Abstract

The aim of the two sessions is to reconsider heresy with a broader understanding of the concept of religious dissent during the long 12th century. We seek to explore this topic by discussing a selection of the various discourses on religion that emerged during this period. We will demonstrate the growing diversity of religious ideology in Western Europe by discussing how these discourses targeted a variety of audiences and served many different purposes. Thus, the sessions will focus on the tumultuous atmosphere wherein various reforming groups risked their total exclusion from the Church and society by attempting to re-negotiate the boundaries of ‘orthodoxy’ from within. In addition, given the purpose of their mission and their position within the Church as monks, nuns, or laymen, these authors felt pressured to better flesh out and redefine certain categories from a social or gender-based perspective, while holding on to tradition.