IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1705: Getting the Message: Historians and Diplomats, c. 1100-1300

Thursday 9 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Arts & Humanities Research Council / Haskins Society
Organisers:Owain Wyn Jones, School of History, Welsh History & Archaeology, Bangor University
Emily A. Winkler, St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford / Department of History, University College London
Moderator/Chair:Dauvit Broun, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Respondent:Emily A. Winkler, St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford / Department of History, University College London
Paper 1705-aNegotiations and Chronicles in Medieval Wales
(Language: English)
Owain Wyn Jones, School of History, Welsh History & Archaeology, Bangor University
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Celtic, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1705-bWriting the Conflicts between Capetian and Plantagenet Kings in 13th-Century Norman Chronicles
(Language: English)
Fabien Paquet, Centre de Recherches Archéologiques et Historiques Anciennes et Médiévales (CRAHAM - UMR 6273) Université de Caen Normandie
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Monasticism, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1705-cHistorians and Diplomats in Angevin England
(Language: English)
Michael Staunton, School of History, University College Dublin
Index terms: Administration, Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Historical writing is often described as appropriating or using the past to reinforce present aims or advance colonial values. This comparative session, based on the organisers’ AHRC-funded project, investigates medieval history-writing not as a replacement strategy, but as a medium for reflecting on relationships between people in the past. How did diplomats use history, and how did historians portray diplomacy? To what extent did historians reflect on the importance of forging, maintaining and altering diplomatic relationships between rulers in the Middle Ages? How did historians and diplomats try to break down the borders and barriers between ‘then’ and ‘now’ in efforts to create mutual understanding in the past—and between reader and writer?