IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1742: Crossing Borders in the Medieval Mystical Tradition, III: Manuscript Transmissions and Texts in Translation

Thursday 9 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Mystical Theology Network / Faculteit Theologie en Religiewetenschappen, KU Leuven
Organiser:Rob Faesen, Institute for the Study of Spirituality, KU Leuven / Ruusbroecgenootschap, Universiteit Antwerpen
Moderator/Chair:Einat Klafter, Cohn Institute for the History & Philosophy of Science & Ideas, Tel Aviv University
Paper 1742-aJohn-Jerome of Prague's Epilogus of Angela of Foligno's Liber: A Long-Forgotten Resource in Angela Studies
(Language: English)
Michael Hahn, School of Divinity, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Theology
Paper 1742-bBordering on Heresy: Glossing Marguerite Porete's Mirror of Simple Souls in England
(Language: English)
Louise Nelstrop, St Benet's Hall, University of Oxford / Department of Theology & Religious Studies, York St John University
Index terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life, Theology
Paper 1742-cCross-Border Perceptions of Medieval Mystical Texts in Translation: Rewriting John of Ruusbroec in Middle English
(Language: English)
John Arblaster, Institute for the Study of Spirituality, KU Leuven / Ruusbroecgenootschap, Universiteit Antwerpen
Index terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life, Theology
Abstract

The sessions sponsored by the Mystical Theology Network will explore fundamental philosophical and theological issues related to medieval conceptions of the presence and absence of borders between the human and the divine, the finite and the infinite, and questions about the reception of mystical texts in different times, places, and languages. To what extent are ‘friendship’ and ‘affectus’ not only general social and psychological concepts, but also central to the historical and spiritual understanding of medieval mystics? How do mystics transgress the boundaries separating divinity and humanity and thus perhaps dissolve such distinctions? And to what extent are the receptions and perceptions of mystical texts dependent on differing contexts?