IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 1757: Medieval Papacy, c. 500-1500, III: In Rome or at the Curia - Knowledge, Information, and Representation

Thursday 9 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Benedict Wiedemann, Department of History, University College London / Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Agata Zielinska, Department of History, University College London
Moderator/Chair:Brenda M. Bolton, University of London
Paper 1757-aPopes, Medical Saints, and Santa Maria Antiqua in the Roman Forum in the 7th and 8th Centuries
(Language: English)
Eileen Rubery, Institute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Ecclesiastical History
Paper 1757-bPopes and Bishops: The Provinciale Romanum and 'Provincial Agency', c. 1200-1500
(Language: English)
Benedict Wiedemann, Department of History, University College London / Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Index terms: Administration, Ecclesiastical History
Paper 1757-cSecrets and Lies: The Politics of Information at the Curia in Avignon
(Language: English)
Melanie Brunner, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The third session of the ‘Medieval Papacy, c. 500-1500’ strand. The remit of these sessions is to break down traditional boundaries (for example, chronological) within the field of papal history. The papers in this session focus on the importance of knowledge and its representation to papal administration and ideology at the papal court and its environs (Rome, Avignon, etc.). Such knowledge was mediated through art, through administrative texts and through gossip and rumour. Paper-a looks at the connections between the church of Santa Maria Antiqua in Rome, its papal patrons and its magnificent artworks. Paper-b examines the ‘Roman provincial’ – a list of the dioceses of Christendom composed by the papacy c.1200 – and that text’s subsequent reception and alteration. Paper-c focuses on the role of gossip and rumour as political currencies by examining the dissemination and tactical use of knowledge at the papal court.