IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 236: Challenging Nationalism(s) and the Medieval Border: Ludlow, Arras, Inchcolm, Tournai

Monday 6 July 2020, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Matthew Siôn Lampitt, Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages & Linguistics/ St John's College University of Cambridge
Moderator/Chair:Emma Campbell, Department of French Studies, University of Warwick
Paper 236-aLocating Ludlow: Rereading the Works of the 'Harley Scribe'
(Language: English)
Matthew Siôn Lampitt, Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages & Linguistics/ St John's College University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 236-bBetween France and Flanders: The Post-Revolutionary Making of Medieval Arras
(Language: English)
Brianne Dolce, Department of Music, Yale University
Index terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Music
Paper 236-cThe 14th-Century Office for St Columba as a Musical Borderland between Scotland and Europe
(Language: English)
Andrew Bull, School of Culture & Creative Arts, University of Glasgow
Index terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Music
Paper 236-dTaming a Rebel: The City of Tournai
(Language: English)
Giulia Boitani, Department of French, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Language and Literature - Latin
Abstract

This interdisciplinary panel of early-career researchers bases its analyses on a series of border centres and regions across north-western Europe, namely: Ludlow, Arras, Inchcolm, and Tournai. Medieval borderland centres such as these are all too often over-written by the post-medieval nation states into which they eventually become assimilated, and this nationalising move frequently inflects readings of such centres’ cultural products. From variously literary and musicological perspectives, our analyses attend to the ways in which these centres and their cultural products disrupt teleological narratives of nation-state development, complicating, problematising, and frustrating notions of the ‘national’, of nationalism(s), and of national identity.