IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 323: Are We Done Talking About Ethnicity?, III: Recent Approaches to Borders in the North

Monday 6 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Ian Peter Grohse, Institutt for historie, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Moderator/Chair:Ian Peter Grohse, Institutt for historie, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Paper 323-aAn Ethnic Border Area: Troms in the Late Iron Age and High Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Astrid Mellem Johnsen, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 323-bDemarcating Contact: 1320s Treaties and the Conditions for Interaction in Northern Fennoscandia
(Language: English)
Lars Ivar Hansen, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 323-cMulti-Room Houses in Northern Norway: Arenas for Border Transgressions and Negotiations in Europe's High North, c. 1200-1450
(Language: English)
Jørn Erik Henriksen, Institutt for arkeologi historie religionsvitenskap og teologi Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Geography and Settlement Studies
Abstract

Different patterns of resource management both distinguished and facilitated contact between ethnic groups in pre-modern northern Fennoscandia. This session investigates the efforts of fledging states to exploit northern populations’ production surplus during the Middle Ages and traces the development of a common taxation district within which the states of Denmark-Norway, Sweden, and Russia concurrently taxed the Sámi population in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries. By studying the efforts of medieval states to exploit resources in the absence of fixed territorial, administrative, and jurisdictional boundaries, these papers highlight the limits of political and territorial demarcation in the High North.