IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 335: Crossing Borders through Manuscript Networks: The Case of Flemish and Scandinavian Connections in the Middle Ages

Monday 6 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Institutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen / Department of Romance Languages & Literatures, Wesleyan University
Organiser:Nick Pouls, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair:Nick Pouls, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 335-aThe Genealogia Flandrensium comitum and Monastic Networks in Flanders, England, France, and Brabant in the 12th and 13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Jeff Rider, Department of Romance Languages & Literatures, Wesleyan University, Connecticut
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 335-bScandinavia and Flanders in the High Middle Ages: Relations Revealed through Manuscript Evidence
(Language: English)
Synnøve Myking, Institutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen
Index terms: Hagiography, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 335-cNorwegian, Danish, or Actually - Flemish?: Some Suspicious Cases from Norwegian Fragment Collections
(Language: English)
Åslaug Ommundsen, Institutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Liturgy, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Through a careful manuscript analysis, networks between different institutions can be traced based on palaeographical, codicological, and philological traits. This session will focus on the transmission of manuscripts and manuscript fragments to illustrate the complexity of provenance. These collections of complete codices and small pieces of parchment are often combination of locally made and imported books, which represent the different Scandinavian and Continental intellectual networks of religious or secular institutions, such as the Flemish-England, Flemish-French, Norwegian-Danish, and Danish-Flemish connections. Which intellectual networks can be traced between intellectual centres through manuscripts and manuscript fragments? Which ‘borders’ were crossed by scribes and manuscripts in the Middle Ages?