IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 358: Anglo-British Borders in the Early Middle Ages, II: The North West

Monday 6 July 2020, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Ben Guy, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Clare Stancliffe, Department of History, Durham University
Moderator/Chair:Clare Stancliffe, Department of History, Durham University
Paper 358-aBattles in the Borders: Cath Manann and Degsastan at the Turn of the 7th Century
(Language: English)
Fiona Edmonds, Department of History, Lancaster University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 358-bTerritorial Boundaries in North-West England in Domesday Book
(Language: English)
Chris Lewis, Institute of Historical Research, University of London / Department of History, King's College London
Index terms: Administration, Geography and Settlement Studies, Local History
Paper 358-cThe Aristocracy of the Northern Anglo-Welsh Borderlands in the 11th and 12th Centuries
(Language: English)
Ben Guy, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Geography and Settlement Studies, Local History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The second session in this series turns to the north-western borders of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. Edmonds examines the battles of Cath Manann and Degsastan fought by Áedán mac Gabráin, king of Dál Riada and foe of Æthelfrith of Bernicia. Lewis looks at how and why the entities recorded in Domesday Book between Ribble and Mersey were stable after 1086 as the basis for the later hundreds of south Lancashire, in contrast to areas north of the Ribble and especially beyond Amounderness. Guy draws together the fragmentary evidence for the land-holding families of the northern Anglo-Welsh borderlands in the 11th and 12th centuries, who were central to attempts by external powers to control the region.