IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 508: Cross-Border Archaeological Approaches to Early Medieval Stone Sculpture

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture (CASSS), Durham University
Organiser:Christina Cowart-Smith, Department of Archaeology, Durham University
Moderator/Chair:Sarah Semple, Department of Archaeology, Durham University
Paper 508-aShaping the Sacred: Defining Early Medieval Ritual Places in North-Western European Landscapes
(Language: English)
Anouk Busset, School of Humanities (Archaeology), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - Sites, Art History - Sculpture
Paper 508-bCrossing the Boundary between the Second and Third Dimension: Digital Imaging in the Analysis of Early Medieval Sculpture
(Language: English)
Megan Kasten, School of Humanities (Archaeology) University of Glasgow
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - Sculpture, Historiography - Modern Scholarship
Paper 508-cFrom Wendron to the Western Isles: Cross-Border Approaches to High Crosses
(Language: English)
Christina Cowart-Smith, Department of Archaeology, Durham University
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - Sculpture, Historiography - Modern Scholarship
Abstract

As the Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture (CASSS) nears its completion, this session honours the legacy of that project by exploring various archaeological approaches to the study of early medieval sculpture. It does this by broadening CASSS’s English remit to include cross-border sculpture examples from both the Insular world and the Continent. Landscape archaeology, photogrammetry, and other multidisciplinary approaches and datasets (place-names, associated artefactual evidence, later documentary evidence) are considered, emphasising particularly those monuments without figuration. In all, the session reflects the 40-year foundation laid by CASSS while also pushing its analytical, technical, and geographic bounds to bring the study of early medieval stone sculpture into the 21st century.