IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 512: At the Borders of Genres, I: Articulating Perceptions of the Past in the Carolingian and Post-Carolingian World - The Library of Verona (i)

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Dipartimento Culture e Civiltà, Università degli studi di Verona / Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Organiser:Marco Stoffella, Dipartimento Culture e Civiltà, Università degli studi di Verona
Moderator/Chair:Helmut Reimitz, Department of History, Princeton University
Paper 512-aCrossing Borders between Scripts: From Scriptorium to Writing School at the Cathedral of Verona in the Time of the Goths, Lombards, and Franks, 6th-9th Centuries
(Language: English)
Massimiliano Bassetti, Dipartimento di Culture e Civiltà Università degli Studi di Verona
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 512-bThe Formation of Perceptions of the Past in Late Antique and Early Medieval Verona
(Language: English)
Rosamond McKitterick, Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 512-cPerceptions of the Past and Calculations of the Present and the Future: Computus and Astronomy in Early Medieval Verona
(Language: English)
Marco Stoffella, Dipartimento Culture e Civiltà, Università degli studi di Verona
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

In this first session on transformations of perceptions of the past, Massimiliano Bassetti focuses on Verona’s manuscript resources and continuity in its book production from the year 517 to the Carolingian period. Rosamond McKitterick suggests that one crucial outcome was the formation of a perception of the past that derived its strength from the crossing of genre borders, as indicated by Jerome’s De viris illustribus. Marco Stoffella explores the development of attitudes towards the reckoning of time, its integration with the historical past, with the liturgical year, and with the prediction of movable feasts in the future in early 9th-century codices.