IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 513: Boundaries of Acceptability: Physical, Moral, and Political Corruption in the Middle Ages, I

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Jack Newman, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (MEMS), University of Kent
Moderator/Chair:Euan Roger, The National Archives, Kew
Paper 513-a'For the many not the few': Defining Common Profit and the Boundaries of Civic Authority in Late Medieval London
(Language: English)
Daniella Gonzalez, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (MEMS), University of Kent
Index terms: Administration, Political Thought
Paper 513-b'It may be commodious to the King': Water Rights and Royal Prerogative in the Inquisitions Ad quod damnum
(Language: English)
Stephen Powell, Center for Medieval Studies, Fordham University, New York
Index terms: Law, Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 513-cWhose Rebellion Is It Anyway?: Corrupting Influences and Conflicts of Interest during the Franco-Flemish War, 1297-1305
(Language: English)
Noah Smith, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (MEMS), University of Kent
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Military History, Social History
Abstract

Corruption is an act which attracts shame and outrage. The narrow contemporary legalistic conception of corruption as simply an abuse of public office for private gain would not be clearly recognisable in the Middle Ages. Corruption in this period is best viewed as a physical or moral decay from a perceived ideal. Few medievalists have explored corruption as a concept. These panels bring together a diverse group of scholars who focus upon corruption from a range of perspectives. They explore political, physical, or moral corruption, scapegoating, and pollution.