IMC 2020: Sessions

Session 521: Frontier Zones in the Mediterranean, I: Material and Immaterial Frontiers in Lombard Italy

Tuesday 7 July 2020, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Italy in Late Antiquity & the Early Middle Ages (ILAEMA), Amsterdam University Press
Organiser:Christopher Heath, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Moderator/Chair:Walter Pohl, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 521-aThe Perceptual Space: Laws, Narratives, and the Lombard Frontiers
(Language: English)
Christopher Heath, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Law, Mentalities
Paper 521-bBorders in 7th- and 8th-Century Italy
(Language: English)
Nicole Lopez-Jantzen, Department of History, Queensborough Community College, City University of New York
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Daily Life, Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 521-cGoing beyond 774: On the Continuation of the Codice Diplomatico Longobardo
(Language: English)
Bernhard Zeller, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Law, Literacy and Orality
Abstract

This session introduces the second part of the sessions on Italy and the Mediterranean as a frontier zone. Christopher Heath commences the session with an analysis of the perceptual framework of frontiers and borders in Lombard Italy and compares this evidence to that presented in narrative sources notably but not exclusively theHistoria Langobardorum of Paul the Deacon. Subsequently, Nicole Lopez-Jantzen will further engage with the situation on the ground in early medieval Italy by considering whether one can identify a ‘borderland’ culture in the peninsula as it grappled with geo-political dynamic change. The session concludes with Bernhard Zeller’s discussion of the continuation of the Codice Diplomatico Longobardo which takes further Zielinski’s work dealing with the post-regnum world of the Lombard princes of Benevento, Salerno, and Capua.